Tuesday, January 3, 2012

Not the Nineteenth Century?!

Dear Nineteenteen Readers,

I have a confession to make.

I’ve been seeing another century.

It isn’t that I don’t love the nineteenth century truly and deeply. And it isn’t that I don’t intend to continue to read and research about it and plan future books in it (I have a new idea for another Regency-set YA that I love, but need to do some research on it first. Poor me, huh?) But lately, I must confess that…well, I’ve been writing a book set in another century. Just barely, mind you—this story is set in 1901, which really, just barely qualifies as not the nineteenth century. I mean, Queen Victoria lived until 1901—doesn’t that count for something?

And…er, well, maybe I shouldn’t say this…but this story isn’t set in England. Not one little bit of it. There aren’t even any British characters in it, though a French grandmother and an obnoxious young vicomte do make appearances. No, it’s totally set in America—remember that trip to Newport, Rhode Island Regina and I posted about last summer?--oh my goodness, please sit down! Do you want me to pat you on the back? May I get you a glass of water?

There, that’s better. I've made a clean breast of it, and hopefully we can all come to terms with it. So of course, I'll just have to share with you some of the wonderful bits of research I’ve come across in the writing of this book (which, by the way, is about two-thirds done—and no, my agent hasn’t yet started looking for a publisher for it yet). So look for the occasional non-nineteenth century, non-English post from me over the next few months, because some of this stuff is just too good to keep to myself.

But meanwhile, we'll still be firmly planted in the nineteenth century next week when Regina and I open the first Young Bluestockings meeting of the year with a look at The Agency: A Spy in the House by Y.S. Lee. Have you had a chance to read it yet? We hope so, and hope also that you'll be ready to talk about it. See you then, and Happy 2012 to you all!

11 comments:

Rachel said...

This post is such a tease! I can't wait to see future posts on 1901 America ;)

Sadly, I couldn't find a copy of that Y.S. Lee novel. My local library and bookstores let me down :*(

It'll still be fun to read what everyone says on it ^___^

Regina Scott said...

Oh, my heart! Smelling salts, quickly!

Actually, you've teased me a bit before about what you've been learning, so I can't wait to hear more! After that trip to Newport, even I am tempted to try a Gilded Age novel. Gorgeous, gorgeous places!

Regina Scott said...

Rachel, sorry you couldn't find the book! If you want to read it later, you might try interlibrary loan. Sometimes you can get the book for free; other times it's like $2. I doubt it would arrive in time for next week, though.

Faith E. Hough said...

Oh, Newport is fascinating. I love visiting there and can't wait to find out what you're working on.

Gio said...

What a tease! I can't wait to see your posts on American history. It sounds very interesting..

Marissa Doyle said...

Hee--sorry, but I couldn't resist the tease...

LilMissMolly said...

I still consider it 19th too. :)

QNPoohBear said...

I have to read this book! Newport is about an hour from here and I'm enchanted with the Gilded Age. I used to love to visit Astors' Beechwood and am heartbroken they couldn't keep the living history museum running. Good luck finishing the novel and finding a publisher.

I read both Y.S. Lee books already and am eagerly awaiting the third. Those who can't get the book can read an excerpt and deleted scene on the author's website http://yslee.com/a-spy-in-the-house/

Marissa Doyle said...

Glad you've read the book, QNPoohBear! I hope you'll comment next week.

And I thought of you when writing this post--I'm loving writing this book too, though the action in it has now moved on to the Adirondacks. The goal is to finish it by March 1...I'll keep you posted on how it fares once it's done!

Deke Solomon said...

Marissa -- the illustrations you've chosen for this page are an absolute joy. Where did you find them?

Deke

Marissa Doyle said...

Hi Deke,

Some of them are from our personal collections--I collect 19th century fashion plates, for example, and have hundreds of them--and others we find on-line. It's a fun job, looking for the perfect illustrations to go with our posts.